Career decision self-efficacy, career barriers, and college women’s experiences of intimate partner violence

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Resumen

Relationships between college women’s experiences of violence from intimate partners, career decision self-efficacy, and perceived career barriers were assessed using social cognitive career theory as a theoretical guide. Among 129 students, sexual coercion was negatively associated with three aspects of career decision self-efficacy (self-appraisal, goal-selection, and problem solving) after adjustment for symptoms of depression, whereas negotiation (a positive conflict tactic) was positively associated with goal-selection self-efficacy. Psychological aggression, physical assault, and injury were not uniquely associated with career decision self-efficacy. Intimate partner abuse was generally unrelated to perceived barriers, with the exception of disability/health concerns, which were negatively related to psychological aggression, sexual coercion, and negotiation. Ideas for future research and implications for career counselors who work with female college students are presented.

Publicación

Estados Unidos de América:
2005

ISBN

1069-0727

Descripción física

288-306

Serie

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